Nutrition watch

10 November, 2006

Red meat, which is regarded as beef, lamb and pork, is a good source of protein.

For example:

100g (approximately 4oz) of average raw lean beef provides about 22g of protein

100g (approximately 4oz) of average raw lean pork provides about 22g of protein

100g (approximately 4oz) of average raw lean lamb provides about 20g protein

Protein is required for repair of all of the body tissues, which occurs imperceptibly on a daily basis.

Proteins are found in all cells of the body and are in the greatest amounts in tissues such as lungs, heart, nails, skin, muscles, in the blood cells and the skeleton as well as in hormones and enzymes.

Proteins are also needed for growth of body tissues, such as occurs in children and teenagers as well as in pregnancy.

Proteins are also needed for the repair of tissues after an injury occurs.

Proteins are made up of tiny building blocks called amino acids.

There are two types of amino acids?the essential ones and non-essential ones. The body cannot manufacture the essential ones and they all need to be present for growth and repair to occur.

Red meat contains all of the essential amino acids while foods such as baked beans or cereals lack one of the essential amino acids. Therefore such foods need to be complemented by another food containing the amino acid.

Red meat is a good source of all the essential amino acids and therefore makes a valuable contribution to the protein content of the diet.





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