Government to look at TSE sheep rules

Sheep producers are to meet with the Food Standards Agency, Defra's TSE division and processors to discuss the financial and practical implications of the current sheep TSE rules next week.

Sheep producers are to meet with the Food Standards Agency, Defra's TSE division and processors to discuss the financial and practical implications of the current sheep TSE regulations, which require the removal of the spinal cord in all sheep aged over 12 months old.

The meeting next week on 12 February will be chaired by NFU livestock board vice chariman, Malcolm meeting. The NFU saidb believes it provides an opportunity for a frank discussion on how the regulation has affected producers and what changes can be made to the current practice of splitting the carcase to remove the spinal cord.

Corbett said: "The devaluation of lambs due to the way the TSE rules are policed in UK abattoirs has gone on for too long, and a solution has to be found as soon as possible.

"There is compelling EU scientific evidence that lamb meat poses negligible risk to the human food chain and therefore the EU rules with regard to sheep age detection and the UK TSE controls need to be changed. Splitting the carcass is not the answer and a new one has to be found. This meeting is an ideal opportunity to gain a solution to the problem once and for all."

Representatives from the FSA and Defra will explain the current procedures and rules to producers as well as getting information from producers and processors about the financial implications of the requirement to split carcasses, which can devalue the product by up to 80 per cent.

The aim of the meeting is to formulate a set of actions which will prevent further devaluation of lamb while maintaining consumer protection. The areas looked at will include: a joint lobbying strategy to lift EU restrictions; getting changes to the UK implementation procedures; different techniques to remove the spinal cord for animals over 12 months old in various plants and solutions to prevent the need to remove the spinal cord of lambs.

Specified Risk Material (SRM) controls for sheep have been in place in the UK since 1996.

The sheep sector believes splitting the carcase in two lengthways devalues the carcass as it can not be hung to mature and the product has a very limited market. It added that BSE has never been found in the UK sheep flock.

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