Berwick Street Market welcomes Butcher & Brine

Quality food traders Butcher & Brine is among a selection of new stalls to open in London’s Berwick Street Market. 

Run by chefs Kevin McCrae and James Sharman, Butcher & Brine’s ethos is to offer high-end food at affordable prices on the streets of London.

The two businessmen met when working together at Tom’s Kitchen in Chelsea, where they had similar aspirations in taking the Michelin experience outside. Between working at the celebrated restaurant and starting their own business, the business-partners climbed the industry ladder and have worked as chefs in Dubai and Hong Kong.

“We dreamt up this idea of bringing restaurant quality food to the streets,” McCrae told Meat Trades Journal.

“We started producing food that you would find in Michelin-star level restaurants and making it as high end as possible, but just throwing it into a box and charging £8 or £10 for it. That’s how it started.”

As well as being at Berwick Street Market from Tuesday to Thursday, they can also be found working one day a week for Kerb, a member organisation made up out of a network of London’s street food traders.

Although the customer feedback has been positive, McCrae admitted that they have faced a challenge due to what they’re marketing. Despite wanting to cater to people looking for lunch, McCrae acknowledged that not everybody wants what they’re offering. However, he believes that it is important to stick to their guns and continue to provide a unique experience.

“The whole point really was bringing restaurant food outside of Michelin-star places and bringing it to people and saying ‘here it is in a box and it’s exactly the same as you would get in a restaurant’, but you would get it for a tenner.”

Butcher & Brine is already looking to the future with a big event lined up in Hong Kong next year, followed by six further events in London.

Looking back at the progress that he and Sharman have made over the years, McCrae is positive about the outlook for Butcher & Brine: “Suddenly we’re cooking all this food that we’ve been cooking for years, taking all that time and all that training and to be able to create this type of food and handing it to the customers, we’re able to watch them eat the food and then hear them come back and tell us how amazing it is, you get such a good feeling from it. That’s more important to us than being at the market making money. We could do dishes that make more money but it’s not about that. It’s about the reaction and doing something different.”

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