Faccenda Foods invests in packing equipment

Faccenda Foods, a company that supplies poultry to the foodservice and retail sectors, has invested in new packaging equipment from Ishida Europe, which accurately weighs chicken legs and drumsticks. 

Installed at Faccenda’s Telford plant, the machine weighs chicken fillets into trays, which then pass through an Ishida Vision System and Seal Tester before being automatically picked and placed into crates via the Ishida IPS system.

Both systems use Ishida’s screwdriver multihead weighing technology – a feature which incorporates the familiar circular multihead weigher layout but also uses rotating corkscrews to replace traditional radial features. This provides a powerful, controlled and fully automatic product feed to the hoppers.

These hoppers are combined with versatile Rotobatchers, which accurately weigh portions despatched to a series of packing stations on a batching table where an operator then places the product into a tray and styles it for effective presentation before the tray gets sealed.

The Ishida Screwfeeder and Rotobatcher has been especially designed to be compact in size, with the Rotobatcher sitting directly under the weigher. This maximises the use of space and has given Faccenda the freedom to create an efficient layout for its legs and drumstick operation with four combinations placed closely together in a square configuration.

This allows for flexibility for the packing solution, allowing for four different options depending on how the poultry has been graded. Another desirable feature is the capability for the machine to handle around 3.5kg of product per minute, as opposed to 2.8kg with the previous system.

A number of checks are carried out as part of Faccenda’s quality control procedures. This includes label presence and position, ensuring the label and date information are correct and the barcode is readable.

The £35m factory in Telford is capable of processing up to 1.5m whole birds per week. The process from initial hanging to sealed pack takes just nine minutes.

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